The Importance of Silliness

Silliness is so much fun. It feels so good, and makes me feel so happy. 

Sometimes I find it so hard. 

This is likely because along with gratitude, silliness is a value I hold that seems to be opposite to society. 

Society seems to value silliness’s rich cousin, who got a new car this year: seriousness. 

Seriousness is everywhere. Seriousness is in our businesses, in our police system, in our laws, on the news, and in our job interviews. 

It’s hard to escape. It first child is called: rulosaurus. Seriousness loves this child so much that it only had one. Seriousness needs rulosaurus to live. He needs rulosaurus to breathe. 

He needs rulosaurus almost as much as he needs his (beautiful) wife: insecurus rex. 

I put beautiful in brackets, because she hates how she looks. So, she doesn’t go outside. Ever. 

She hates to say anything, because she doesn’t like the way her voice sounds, so she doesn’t talk. 

Seriousness’s family works together to create an uncomfortable world at best. 

Rulosaurus is always running off getting into trouble, and becaue insecurus rex can never go outside, she always loses him. That’s when Seriousness gets mad. Which happens a lot. 

The whole family is always on edge, and overall, it’s just a sad situation. 

So, in summary, never be serious, don’t care about rules, and stop feeling insecure. (cross lines through this)

Of course, I am not saying to avoid the entire family. If you’re crossing the border, a little bit of seriousness definitely would less harm than it would do good. 

If you’re going to a new country, it would be an AMAZING idea to send rulosaurus to the doctor for a check-up. See if anything has changed. Review his old medical history. Get to know him. 

But insecurus rex, she is where we will start our discussion. 

This dinosaur disguised as a value has no real purpose at all. But, it seems this is who our friend seriousness leans on the most. After all, it is his wife. 

We feel we need to be serious because we are insecure with ourselves. We are scared that the person or part of the world we are trying to impress won’t like us, so we tighten up, and we become seriousness to mask showing our real selves. 

So if seriousness is masking our real selves, it definitely sounds like something to avoid. And it is. 

But that leaves us with a problem: what about when we’re crossing the border? Shouldn’t we be serious then? What about a business meeting, or a job interview? 

In these situations, instead of being serious, we should be silly. 

Now I know what you’re thinking. Silly when crossing the boarder? I don’t think so. 

In the traditional sense of the word, when you might picture a clown costume, and some sort of high pitch, silly voice with bad jokes, I would agree with you. 

No, the silly I am talking about is special kind of silly. It is a calculated type of silly. 

The first part of this silly is an extremely strong awareness of your surroundings. 

This includes what people are saying, what they are doing, what’s going on in the background, sounds you hear, things you smell, vibes you get, vibes you give off, subtext, reading between the lines, what people are saying, what people are communicating, what non-people are doing, what they are saying, who they’re talking about, and of course, what they’re saying. 

The level of awareness I am talking about is INTENSE. 

It is a sort of computer-level-accurate kind of observing the world. It is exhaustive, and it is always working. There is nothing it misses. 

Our brains are powerful things, and part of them should always be connected to what’s happening around us. 

But even with extreme awareness, we’re still an obnoxious clown trying to cross the border. 

This is where the second part of silliness comes in. 

It’s this idea of MATCHING. 

With an intense awareness of your surrounds, one thing you might pick up is the silliness levels of those around you. 

This second part is easy: match your silliness levels to those around you. And unless silliness levels are extremely low, maximize your silliness levels. 

This way, there is no losing. And who likes losing? Not me. 

As long as we are not making less-silly people aware of their lack of silliness by being too silly, we shouldn’t upset them. 

For everyone else, silliness is awesome. 

We can break it down to three parts: enthusiasm, humor, and security. 

Everyone loves enthusiasm. It’s contagious. Don’t believe me? Look at every leader ever. 

And when we are silly, we’re usually enthusiastic about it. I usually find myself feeling a sort of overwhelming sense of delight that world usually loves. 

With enthusiastic silliness comes humor. Laughing. I laugh, you laugh. Everyone laughs. And laughing feels amazing. It makes me happy. (hyperlink to happy article). 

And while we’re laughing, we always forget one thing: insecurity. 

I usually don’t find myself thinking much when I am laughing, or being silly for that matter. 

And if we’re not thinking, we can’t pick ourselves apart. In fact, I find I’m not even thinking about myself. 

Usually silliness helps me think more of others. It helps me become empathetic. 

And when we focus our energy on others and being silly, instead of focusing it on ourselves, and on what we should be insecure about, happiness usually comes. 

    In summary, seriousness can safely be eliminated from our lives and replaced with an INTENSE level of awareness of our surroundings at all times. 

    With this awareness, we pair awesome silliness all the time. When our environment is less silly, we be less silly, but otherwise, we take the silliness to the max. 

And with that, we conclude your pleasant experience of receiving a cool new idea today. 

Boy, do I love writing to you. You’re such a good reader, and listener. Did I mention I love your earrings? No? You’re not wearing any? I meant to say ears? Is that weird? I’m weird? 

No I’m not. I’m just a silly little goose ;)